Commissions, Wall Installations
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Design Challenge Accepted

Mock Up of a Gallery Install of Ascension, 46" tall by 36" wide.

When I was contacted by one of my favorite designers regarding a possible project for a hospital chapel, I was thrilled. A healthcare facility in the greater Chicago area was finishing a new addition to their campus that included a chapel and needed artwork for the chapel entrance wall. There was only one small catch . . . the wall was convex.

This is an interesting design challenge. It was a large entryway that would require a large piece. Larger than what could fit in the kiln. In addition, the wall was convex and would not accommodate our go-to mounting options.

I love working with designers and creative types. Together, we solved the challenge with a proposal for an elongated triptych. Each piece measures 46″ tall by only 10″ wide. The smaller width of each piece allowed just enough to accommodate the curvature of the wall.

The composition of “Ascension” is full of symbolism. First, the piece is a triptych to symbolize the trinity. The teals and blues represent calmness and stillness. The golden metallic represents ascending from that peaceful space. The reclaimed glass has been crushed, fired and reborn into something new and beautiful. The entire composition represents the continuing cycle of renewal we each face both in the spiritual and the physical planes.

The chapel is a non-denominational prayer space for patients and loved ones waiting for answers. The idea of rising up is universal among all people, religious or not and my hope is that it offers a small lift to those who enter.

Textural Detail of "Ascension" by Mira Woodworth
“Ascension”sculptural wall triptych by Mira Woodworth
Textural detail of “Ascension” by Mira Woodworth.
Mock Up of a Gallery Install of Ascension, 46" tall by 36" wide.
Mock Up of a Gallery Install of Ascension, 46″ tall by 36″ wide.
Textural Detail of "Ascension" by Mira Woodworth
Textural Detail of “Ascension” by Mira Woodworth
Detail of edge of mounted glass prior to framing.
Detail of edge of mounted glass prior to framing.

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